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What did the Ugandan Red Cross Society know about “the ‘miracle’ solution to defeat malaria” Video?

Last month I wrote a blog on the alleged clinical trial that had been done using Miracle Mineral Solution as a cure for malaria: Fake and Unethical Trial: Video Claims Miracle Mineral Solution Cures Malaria. The International Red Cross (IFRC) and the Ugandan Red Cross Society (URCS) have dissociated themselves from this video. That statement unfortunately does not give any information on what did actually happen in Luuka, Uganda according to the Red Cross organisations.

In the comments on the different language versions of the YouTube video I engaged the original uploader of the video, Andreas Kalcker. I put forward my theory about what we see in the video. In short: they used a quick test for malaria to test the participants in this ‘trial’; a test which has no real validity in those circumstances. Most probably all people who tested positive for malaria on the first day, did not actually have malaria at that moment, which was confirmed by the proper test (blood slide) the next day (see earlier blog for details)
These comments were not appreciated it seems, as the comments sections of most videos were closed shortly after. They only remained open on the German version. Kalcker first challenged me there to send him my e-mail address so that he could send me the documents which prove that the URCS was involved and knew about the malaria ‘trial’. But he blocked me at the same time. Anyway, this was of course a lame excuse, because I’m easily found on the Internet. Later however, he did actually send me a document and pictures, which are now also linked under the YouTube video. But all my comments, including those about the inappropriate use of the quick tests, were removed from the comments thread.

You can download the most interesting document here: Water Purification Pilot Case – Uganda (pdf).

It was probably written during the negotiations between Klaas Proesmans, Leo Koehof and the URCS. It is mostly about using MMS for water purification, but it also states cleary that the pilot is about malaria as well:

It is from within this unique platform that WRC wants to perform a Due Diligence on ClO2 and NaClO2 and its effects on water purification and possible positive side effects in the fight against malaria.

Another important issue in the document:

The Project Manager and Project Sponsor, Mr Klaas Proesmans, has the overall authority and responsibility for managing and executing this project according to this Project Plan and its Subsidiary Management Plans.

Note carefully that this is an unsigned draft and I don’t have any information about a definitive (signed) version of this document and whether that still talks about testing for malaria. I asked Proesmans whether the document is authentic. He didn’t give a clear answer, but he did not deny it either.

The WRC dissociates from the video as well
The WRC dissociates itself from the video as well, but does CEO Proesmans feel the same?

The Water Reference Center in the mean time has disassociated itself form the video in a  statement (archived copy) similar to the one of the IRCF. It is dated May 24th, only a few days after my phone conversation with Ruud Koornstra, secretary of the board of the WRC, but only published on June 3rd, just after I e-mailed Koornstra whether there would be any update on the involvement of the WRC.

I mailed the URCS as well asking them whether the document is authentic. I had hoped (and still do) that they would publish a more detailed statement of what happened in Luuka and what the exact nature of the cooperation was between the Water Reference Center/Proesmans and the URCS. Unfortunately I didn’t receive a response up to today. I think that leaving it to the quacks to come with their version of the events is possibly more damaging for the reputation of the Red Cross than admitting that something went wrong. I’ll quote the last part of my earlier blog on this ‘trial’, because it still applies, I think.

 The Ugandan Red Cross Society might be trying to hide a terrible blunder, but it’s not a cover-up of a successful test of MMS for malaria in any case.

Whether you believe that such a product as MMS can cure diseases or not, there is no excuse whatsoever to carry out a trial bypassing all ethical en scientific research standards as was clearly the case in this ‘trial’. The only reassurance is that the participants probably had no malaria to start with, they also looked quite healthy.

Follow up in:

Update on MMS malaria ‘trial’ in Uganda

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16 thoughts to “What did the Ugandan Red Cross Society know about “the ‘miracle’ solution to defeat malaria” Video?”

  1. I was given an article to read in an American magazine . This was in the late 90’s. It told a story of an American
    working in Central America,who gave a malaria sufferer some of his purified water. The water he would drink
    while working in Central America. The story he told was quite worrying regards possible disbelief and angering
    certain parties who would lose profits with this inexpensive ( possible cure ). He continued to use what he thought was a possible cure with 100% success rate.
    Can anybody place this article or even find any information about this individual who had problems with attempting to bring his possible findings to light?
    I may have this completely wrong. A story told can sometimes grasp the wrong end of a paint stirring stick.

    1. This was probably an article about Jim Humble, who made up the claims about MMS and founded the Genesis II church.

  2. I just noticed that the website of the Water Reference Center of Proesmans has undergone some changes. The message in which ‘they’ distance themselves from the trial has vanished. It has been archived though: http://archive.is/cP6PE

  3. Has the Red Cross, or anyone else tried to end this debate by doing another test? It should be very simple to do. The writer of this article should just find a malaria victim, fly him to an official laboratory, have them draw some blood, perform all the test and confirm the disease. Then place the blood under a microscope with a camera attached. Then publish the results. By the way, cure the victim if it kills the malaria.

    1. This sort of remarks have been made several times by others on the three posts have written on this subject. Check out the comments for why I think it’s ridiculous. You just don’t experiment on really sick people when there isn’t the slightest plausibility that the proposed cure will work.

  4. Of course it does. I can hardly believe that you weren’t surprised by the statements of Proesmans himself in the video.
    But let anyone decide for himself after seeing the facts.
    Therefore: Thank you for publishing the video on your site. That’s fair.

  5. LEAKED VIDEO Undeniably Proves Red Cross Performed a Successful Field Test Using MMS on Malaria
    [mod: removed the comments on the video, which everybody can read on YouTube. The video itself I linked already on the first blog on this subject.]

  6. The writer of this above article is still deceiving you. All malaria
    victims who tested positive with what the writer called “quick test for
    malaria” were then tested by the positive blood count test by an
    accredited microscope and technician. It was shown in the Video that
    the writer watched that the actual blood count was done but he chose to
    not mention it. All the critics who are writing about this test are
    also choosing to not mention the microscope, technician, and the malaria
    parasite blood count. This is a standard ploy in these situations. If
    they don’t want you to know the truth they put both what appears to be
    positive and negative liars on to lie about it and throw enough
    confusion on the line that the truth is covered up.

    It is
    simple to understand once you realize if the Red Cross would save a million
    lives this coming year for about 25 cents per life millions of dollars
    of income from standard malaria treatment would be lost and all the
    payoffs in the government and Red Cross would be lost. So millions of
    people get to die so that the Red Cross and government can have their
    blood money. AND OF COURSE THE CRITICS WHO COME WRITE THESE WRITE-UPS
    TO DECEIVE YOU.

    We make no money from the sales of MMS or Chlorine Dioxide. Our 700+ ministers of health treat hundreds of sick people including malaria daily. They work for free only asking for donations once the individual has their health restored. You may keep this knowledge covered up for a few more weeks causing the death of thousands, but eventually the world will know that Chlorine Dioxide cures malaria in 4 hours. Then it will be your time to calculate how many deaths you did indeed cause.

    1. quote Jim Humble:

      All malaria
      victims who tested positive with what the writer called “quick test for
      malaria” were then tested by the positive blood count test by an
      accredited microscope and technician. It was shown in the Video that
      the writer watched that the actual blood count was done but he chose to
      not mention it. All the critics who are writing about this test are
      also choosing to not mention the microscope, technician, and the malaria
      parasite blood count.

      I addressed this issue in my previous blog: https://www.pepijnvanerp.nl/2013/05/fake-and-unethical-trial-video-claims-miracle-mineral-solution-cures-malaria/ We can’t take it for granted that the video and voice-over give an accurate description of what happened. I state again: there is no clear evidence that anybody of the participants was suffering from malaria when they entered the ‘test’.

      You’re further allegations make no sense whatsoever. I don’t think the Ugandan Red Cross Society is very happy with this video and documents, not because of some mircale cure being revealed, but because it shows that they were not clever enough to see how their involvement would be used by your organisation.

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